Archive for April, 2018

Poultry Price List

This is the price list for poultry.2
For eggs, please go here.
For large volume sales, separate prices will be negotiated. PLEASE NOTE WE HAVE KEPT OUR PRICES THE SAME FOR A FURTHER 6 months.

Breeds subject to availability March 2018.

Araucana (lays blue eggs).
Brahma.
Buff Orpington.
Cream Legbar.
Frizzle.
Light Sussex.
Dolly Mixtures. ALL Different.
Pekin Bantams.
Barred Plymouth Rock.
Rhode Island Red.
Silkie
Quail Italian
Turkey Reds+ Bronze
Ducks……..Various Breeds
Geese Emden this year’s birds.
Special breeds of Quail, Ducks and Geese are available upon request. Prices discussed on enquiry.

Species Count – Wild Plants

Arum
Ash
Bind weed
Birch
Blackberry
Blue Iris
Bracken

Species Count – Garden Escapes

Garden escapes
Bamboo
Buddliah
Christmas tree
Cistus
Cotoneaster
Elephants ears

Species Count – Wild Animals

Wild animals
Barn owl
Fox
Grey squirrel
Hedgehog
Mice (various)
Pheasant
Rabbit
Rat (oversize)
Rook
Various insects

Black Welsh Mountain Sheep

A medium sized hardy breed, able to survive in the bleak Welsh mountains. The mountain fodder is frequently poor and sparse. Agile and self-sufficient, they do not suffer from foot rot to the same extent that lowland breeds do. Similarly, they are mostly immune to fly strike.

The ram is heavier than the Ewes, with horns that spiral out from the head. Ewes are not horned. The coat is a dense fine wool that can be spun, or used in felt and carpets. Normally black; the wool can develop a reddish tinge under a strong sun. There is a ‘badger variant’ that has white areas, particularly on the head, but also the legs and tail. The meat is of fine texture and taste.

Currently, we have Burlington Bertie no 2 our head ram, three younger rams and 40 ewes.

Soay Sheep

Soay – the Norse word for sheep – are a small and ancient breed. They are believed to be the ancestor of the domestic breeds. In modern times, the only natural population is on the Isle of Soay, in the Outer Hebrides, where they have run wild for centuries. Agile and quick-footed, they often ‘hop jump’, as they skittishly run from danger. They cannot be driven in a conventional manner due to their unpredictable nature.

They have a slight build and are much smaller than domestic sheep. Both sexes are horned, the male’s horns are much heavier, and may form a complete circle. The coat is often shaggy to look at, as it is self- shedding. It is normally a dull brown or tawny colour, although it can range to black.

Being a primitive bred, their tails do not need docking. They do not suffer from foot root. Soay can live happily on relatively small amounts of poor grazing, scrub, and weeds. Their flesh particularly lean for a sheep, and a gourmet treat.

Currently, we have 10 rams and 15 ewes. First Lamb born 20th February 2008 a little girl.A Breeding programme going very well. March 2010 Interesting that Lambs born so far are all Female, we are really pleased as this helps the breeding programme.

About Our Animals

Barn Farm (Now Wern Uchaf Farm Wales) has been set up as a working agricultural unit running a variety of livestock and producing traditionally grown foods. A The farm is a viable economic unit in its own right but has, in addition, the facility to help people unfortunate enough to be long-term sick or with some forms of disability by giving them the opportunity of regaining confidence by working on the land or with the animals.

No use of pesticides.

Nearly all wood preservatives are low impact (rather than a powerfull substance that lingers and will poison everything).
Use of predators (ie chicken) to keep populations of pests low.

Conservation

Barn Farm (Now Wern Uchaf Farm Wales) is a small section of unpolluted rich meadowland. We would like to keep it that way. This list will be updated in future.

Ecology

In principle the ecology of the farm is simple – in practice a little harder!

Although we are in communication with them, Barn Farm is not currently registered with the Soil Association because we have to buy in our foodstuffs and hay rather than produce it ourselves. We do however try to conform to organic standards in as many ways as we can.

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